CAPSIZING OF A SHIP IN QUARTERING SEAS, PART 1: MODEL EXPERIMENTS ON MECHANISM OF CAPSIZING

Model tests on the capsizing of a container ship running in quartering seas were performed using a radio-controlled model. From the results, three characteristic features were clarified. Firstly, most capsizings occurred in the range of the encounter angle of 20 deg to 40 deg, and the range was spread to 0 deg to 50 deg as ship speed increased. Secondly, as ship speed decreased, the capsizing decreased and there existed a critical ship speed below which capsizing never occurred. Thirdly, the direction of the capsizing was always to the leeside. On the basis of these results, a hypothesis is presented that such capsizing may be explained fundamentally as a simple static phenomenon that occurs because the capsizing moment of the wave statically exceeds the restoring moment decreased in the quartering wave in the dangerous range of the encounter angle. The reason why the capsizing occurs only in the high speed-range and only to the leeside direction is also explained in connection with surf-riding motion or asymmetric nonlinear surging motion of large amplitude.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Journal article
  • Authors:
    • Kan, M
    • Saruta, T
    • Taguchi, H
  • Publication Date: 1990-6

Language

  • Japanese

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00661067
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Maritime Technical Information Facility
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 21 1994 12:00AM