THE COUNTERPLAN FOR TRANSPORTATION IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA: SPEND LESS, SERVE MORE

The report argues that the 30-year transportation plan for the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority is out of touch with the realities of transportation in Southern California. The region is characterized by low population density and decentralization of jobs via continued suburbanization. These factors have led to continued growth in auto use and decline in the use of public transit. The recommendation made in the report is to develop a transportation system consistent with land-use patterns. The key to doing that is to achieve higher vehicle occupancy on the streets and freeways. That means encouraging new forms of door-to-door transit via a 3-part program: 1) create an expanded network of transitways, to permit meaningful time savings for eligible vehicles; 2) deregulate van, taxi, and jitney services to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship in creating these new modes; and 3) introduce peak-hour pricing on freeways, beginning with high occupancy/toll lanes. In parallel with these three policy changes, new rail lines that are not already fully committed should be canceled, permitting major savings in both capital costs and operating subsidies. In addition, the Metrolink commuter rail service should be canceled, with express bus and van services meeting the needs of those commuters. The net effect of these policy changes would be significantly higher average vehicle occupancy, higher average speeds and reduced traffic congestion, greater transit use than under current rail-based plans, reduced air pollution, and over 125,000 new jobs in new transit firms.

  • Record URL:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Reason Foundation

    3415 S Sepulveda Boulevard, Suite 400
    Los Angeles, CA  United States  90034
  • Authors:
    • Gordon, P
    • Richardson, H W
  • Publication Date: 1994-2

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 22 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00667341
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Policy Study No. 174
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 17 1994 12:00AM