Florida's noise control program began in 1971 and gradually increased its scope and effectiveness in the following years with an increase in funding from 36,000 dollars in 1972 to 88,000 dollars in 1974. Its key responsibility is the development of a comprehensive statewide program for the prevention, control, and abatement of all excessive and unnecessary noise. In fulfilling this responsibility, it conducts research, develops plans, enforces noise laws coordinates with other agencies and groups, and provides for the dissemination of pertinent information. Since the onset of the noise control program, the Florida legislature has been primarily concerned with motor vehicle noise. However, until 1974 very few noise control bills managed to pass into law. In 1974, three bills directly related to noise control were introduced: a bill that would limit motor vehicles to one horn or warning device with a sound emitting capability no greater than the vehicle manufacturer's original equipment (failed); a bill that directed FDOT to incorporate in the construction of state highways both artifical and natural means of abating highway noise (passed both houses); and a bill that was related to motor vehicle bill, known as the Vogt-Easley Bill, is discussed at length in this paper. It eventually became the Motor Vehicle Noise Prevention and Control Act of 1974.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures;
  • Pagination: pp 85-93
  • Monograph Title: Motor vehicle noise control
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00098532
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Aug 27 1975 12:00AM