LONGITUDINAL STRENGTH OF THE FORE BODY OF SHIPS SUFFERING FROM SLAMMING

A number of ships have sustained fatal forebody damage from heavy slamming in rough seas. The authors describe a series of model tests that were carried out to study the mechanism of such failures and to evaluate the ultimate longitudinal strength of hull forebodies by applying forces simulating slamming impact loads. The three forebody models tested were designed to be similar to the forebodies of a 50,000 dwt bulk carrier, a 120,000 dwt ore carrier and a 1,400 TEU containership. Scale ratios ranged from one-sixth to one-eighth. In all cases, the side shells yielded first to heavy shear stress. The yield zone then spread throughout the side shells, leading to a progressive increase in deck plating longitudinal stress that could eventually cause buckling. For bulk carriers and ore carriers with U-form sections, collapse occurred immediately after a whole section of the deck structure buckled. In the case of containerships with V-form sections, collapse followed the spread of yielding throughout the side shells. An analytical method to predict the ultimate strength of hull forebodies subjected to heavy shearing force in addition to bending moment is also presented.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Journal article
  • Authors:
    • Endo, H
    • Aoki, G
    • YAMAMOTO, Y
  • Publication Date: 1988-6

Language

  • Japanese

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00656740
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Maritime Technical Information Facility
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 21 1994 12:00AM