STEERING GUINEA-BISSAU INTO THE COMMERCIAL MARITIME WORLD--A CASE STUDY

Guinea-Bissau is a small country on the west coast of Africa. It gained independence from Portugal in 1974 and has since been trying to cope with many of the problems that often confront young developing countries. By 1980, the port of Bissau proper consisted of two T-shaped piers: the Commercial Quay, mainly used for oceangoing vessels and fishing vessels; and the smaller Navy Quay, used for naval vessels, port service vessels and inland navigation boats. Following feasibility studies, a project to develop the facilities of the port was undertaken. It called for: land reclamation to provide a cargo-handling area; a new pier; four new inland barge piers; the rehabilitation and extension of the country's aids to navigation; rehabilitation of the Commercial Quay; the construction of eight new ferry ramps, nationwide; new offices and housing for port staff; the construction of a buoyage vessel; and a program for training personnel in the operation and maintenance of aids to navigation. Treating this project as a case study, this article informs the reader about the scope of the project and highlights some of its interesting aspects.

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  • Accession Number: 00656616
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Maritime Technical Information Facility
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 21 1994 12:00AM