ROLE OF COMPUTERS IN WIDE-ARE CONTROL OF ROAD TRAFFIC, PART 1

The author describes the various forms of traffic control to date (except computer control) in the first of a four-part series on the application of computers to traffic control. Automatically-operated signals replaced manual ones in 1926, and vehicle-actuated signals were introduced in 1932. A contact-strip vehicle detector under 1 rubber pad was set into the road surface. Groups of controlled intersections are often linked by fixed-time sequences. A 'master' controller allows for discrepancies in traffic-flow volumes. Fixed-time cycles are suitable for heavy traffic flows. Pneumatic detectors replaced contact-strip detectors, and electronic timing circuits superseded neon-type timing circuits. Fixed time and vehicle-actuated modes of traffic control do not respond quickly enough to the multitude of traffic situations experienced within cities. When two or more linked controls require to use the same controller at the same instant, indecisions are created in the controller. See also IRRD abstracts nos. 211596-211598. /TRRL/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • See also HRIS 096739, 096740 and 096741.
  • Corporate Authors:

    IPC Building and Control Journals, Limited

    Dorset House, Stanford Street
    London SE1 9LU,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Honey, D W
  • Publication Date: 1974-8-16

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00096738
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 30 1975 12:00AM