CANADIAN EXPERIMENTS UNDERWAY: SOLVING FROST-HEAVE PROBLEM WITH SULPHER FOAM INSULATION

Sulphur foam insulation is described which is manufactured in place at the construction site and which can be made with high compressive strength (which eliminates the need for a protective gravel bed). Cost and performance factors are being examined of a 100 foot long section of sulphur foam laid down in Calgary, Canada, followed by 4 to 5 inches of asphalt concrete directly above it. Called 'Furcoat', the insulation is 85 percent sulphur and diisocyanate and is produced when the blowing agent (carbon dioxide) is mixed with molten sulphur. The agent produces small gas bubbles which cause the liquid sulphur to foam. When cooled the foam becomes rigid. The product has low density, high strength and a uniform cellular structure. Sulphur, which is a byproduct of crude oil, is readily available at low price. Roads insulated with this foam will require excavation to only a depth of 15 inches.

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: 2 p.
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00096270
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 15 1975 12:00AM