AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF DRIVER MIRROR USAGE WITH PERISCOPE AND CONVENTIONAL REAR VISION SYSTEM

This paper presents research conducted to investigate the merits of a periscopic rear vision system as compared to a conventional rear vision system in passenger vehicles. The periscopic system consists of a conventional side view mirror and a roof mounted periscopic rear vision mirror. The data on mirror sampling of the test drivers was recorded by directly photographing the drivers' eyes while driving the experimental vehicle. Data collection was restricted to the freeway, and involved specific driving tasks which included changing lanes, passing, entering, and existing the freeway. Some of the important results of this study are: The total time spent by the drivers in using the two rear vision systems was not found to be statistically different. However, the total time spent by the drivers on the two mirror systems was found to be significantly different for the different tasks. The manner in which the drivers time-shared with the side view mirror and rear view mirror (or periscope) was found to be significantly different for the two mirror systems as well as the tasks. The mean glance durations on the rear view mirror and the periscope mirror were not found to be different for the two mirror systems for all the tasks studied in this project. The mean glance durations on the side view mirrors were found to be significantly different for the two mirror systems as well as the different tasks. /Author/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Ohio State University, Columbus

    Systems Research Group, 2070 Neil Avenue
    Columbus, OH  United States  43210
  • Authors:
    • Hoffmeister, D H
  • Publication Date: 0

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 11 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00099587
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 5 1975 12:00AM