A REVIEW OF VEHICLE DESIGN TO REDUCE ACCIDENTS IN RELATION TO ROAD SAFETY

The major conclusion from a survey of the literature on vehicle design factors related to the occurrence of accidents is that little is known of this relationship. There is, however, an extensive literature on "implied" dafety, that is, of the type "if we do this then the car should be safer." This literature is based usually on sound principles of safety and ergonomics, but at the present time there is no empirical relationship to safety - in many cases because the particular design feature has not been adequately tried in production vehicles. This report is presented in two parts. Part I surveys known relationships between vehicle design and accident occurrence and a number of suggestions are made concerning vehicle braking, tires and visibility, all of which would be fairly simple to incorporate in vehicle design. Part II surveys "implied" safety and makes recommendations for research into areas which are likely to be effective in reducing accidents. In each part of the report special problems of commercial vehicles and two-wheeled vehicles are treated separately. /Author/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by Australian Department of Transport.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Melbourne University, Australia

    Grattan Street
    Parkville, Victoria 3052,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Hoffman, E R
  • Publication Date: 1973-6

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 174 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00098860
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NR/7
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 5 1975 12:00AM