HOW DRIVERS PREVENTED FROM DRIVING WOULD REACH WORK: IMPLICATIONS FOR PENALTIES

The validity of the assumption that loss of a driving license would result in economic hardship for most drivers examined. Persons who drive to work were asked how they would reach work if a broken leg prevented them from driving. Only 21% said they would not be able to make other arrangements. Of those who thought they could find other transportation, two-thirds said the alternative would cost no more than driving themselves. Less than one-fifth said the time required would be more than an additional half hour per day. The results indicate that policies and practices related to license suspension and revocation should not be based on an assumption that job loss or economic hardship would be experienced by most drivers if they were to lose their driving privileges. /Author/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

    Department of Public Health Administration
    Baltimore, MD  United States 

    Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

    1005 North Glebe Road
    Arlington, VA  United States  22201
  • Authors:
    • Baker, S P
    • Robertson, L S
  • Publication Date: 1974-10

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 15 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00098847
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-015 816
  • Files: HSL, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 18 1975 12:00AM