STUDY OF CLAY SHALE SLOPES ALONG THE PANAMA CANAL. REPORT 2: HISTORY, GEOLOGY, AND MECHANICS OF DEVELOPMENT OF SLIDES IN GAILLARD CUT. VOLUME 1: TEXT

The sliding associated with construction of the Panama Canal began with early French excavation and has continued with intermittent activity until the present, 60 years after opening of the canal to traffic. More than 60 slides, ranging up to more than 23 million cubic yards in volume, are described in detail in this report to provide a background for general conclusions of slide activity of this type and setting. Slides developed in the Tertiary volcanic sedimentary rocks with the most important ones localized in the shale-rich Cucaracha and Culebra formations near the Isthmian Divide. Geological structures played a basic part in slide development. Most slide movements involved slippage along weak bedding inclined gently into the excavation. Contributing factors were high groundwater and surcharging by excavation dumps. The slide configurations are presented in Volume II (Plates of Maps and Sections).

  • Corporate Authors:

    U.S. Army Waterways Experiment Station

    3909 Halls Ferry Road
    Vicksburg, MS  United States  39180-6199
  • Authors:
    • Lutton, R J
  • Publication Date: 1975-4

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 213 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00098293
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: S-70-9-Vol-1 Final Rpt.
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 29 1975 12:00AM