SIXTH SYMPOSIUM ON THE FUTURE OF CONURBATION TRANSPORT IVB. OUT-OF-TOWN SHOPPING CENTRES V. CITY CENTRES

Consumer's expenditure is expected to increase in real terms by about three per cent per year. There has also been an increase in efficiency of utilisation of store floor space with the advent of multiples, and a trend towards larger supermarkets. Shopping demand is influenced by a large number of factors such as catchment population and economic wealth, and is significantly affected by the growth in car availability for housewives. The older forms of shopping street have many disadvantages, for example pedestrian-vehicle conflict, congested car access, poor public transport servicing, and difficulties of central area staff recruitment. As a result, a wide range of alternative provision for shopping is now being developed, including regional shopping centres, hypermarkets and supermarkets and the corner shop. The fundamental question concerning hypermarkets is whether car-oriented shoppers should benefit at the expense of the rest of the population, as local supermarkets would be put out of business. In choosing a site for a regional centre or hypermarket, access is a most important factor. Most developments have been planned with adjacent access to a motorway or high-speed highway. A vital factor in planning major shopping developments is to consider traffic engineering arrangements to cater for the predicted arrival-departure pattern. For covering abstract of the conference see IRRD abstract no. 216149. /TRRL/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Manchester University, England

    Department of Extra-Mural Studies, Holly Royal College
    Manchester M60 1QD,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Dick, A C
  • Publication Date: 1972-10

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00131440
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Conf Paper
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: May 14 1976 12:00AM