TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND AND THE U.S.A.: A CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF ASSOCIATED FACTORS

This report presents the results of a cross-cultural analysis of factors associated with traffic accidents in Finland and the U.S.A. The analysis was based on U.S. data from 1988 and Finnish data from 1987-89 and, whenever possible, on fatal accidents. The findings are presented in a tabular and figural form with an accompanying commentary for each table and figure. Because of the potential reporting differences in the two countries, the present findings should be interpreted with caution and should be viewed only as indicating possible trends. With this caveat in mind, the following are some of the factors with differential involvement in traffic accidents in the two countries. Proportionally more rural accidents occur in Finland than in the U.S. The fatality rate per vehicle mileage is higher in Finland, but the rate per capita is higher in the U.S. The injury rates tend to be lower in Finland than in the U.S. There are proportionally less driver and passenger fatalities, and more pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities in Finland than in the U.S. There are proportionally less truck and motorcycle fatalities, but more passenger car and bus fatalities in Finland than in the U.S. The fatal accident rate for motorcycles is substantially higher in the U.S. than in Finland. The rate for mopeds is higher in Finland than in the U.S., and the rate for buses is somewhat higher in Finland than in the U.S. The Finnish fatal accidents peak in July, November, and December, while those in the U.S. peak in July through October. The Finnish fatal accidents peak on Fridays, while those in the U.S. peak more substantially on Saturdays. The Finnish fatal accidents are most numerous between the hours of 15:00 and 17:00, while the U.S. data show a less pronounced but more extended peak from 15:00 through 3:00. Proportionally more fatal accidents occur during the hours of darkness in the U.S. than in Finland. There are proportionally more fatal accidents in winter conditions in Finland. Proportionally more young motorcyclists, and old bicyclists and pedestrians are killed in Finland than in the U.S. Alcohol related accidents are more frequent in the U.S. than in Finland. In Finland (but not in the U.S.) the proportion of killed passengers in the vehicle of intoxicated drivers is greater than the proportion of all sober road-users killed.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored by the Academy of Finland, Hameentie 68, SF-00550 Helsinki, Finland.
  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute

    2901 Baxter Road
    Ann Arbor, MI  United States  48109-2150
  • Authors:
    • Luoma, J
    • Sivak, M
  • Publication Date: 1992-8

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: 28 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00629015
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute
  • Report/Paper Numbers: UMTRI-92-26, HS-041 440
  • Files: HSL, TRIS
  • Created Date: May 10 1993 12:00AM