SAFETY STUDY: ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG INVOLVEMENT IN FATAL GENERAL AVIATION ACCIDENTS, 1983 THROUGH 1988

This study examines alcohol involvement in fatal general aviation accidents that occurred from 1983 through 1988. Despite a downward trend in alcohol-involved general aviation accidents that were fatal to the pilot during the 1983 through 1988 period, about 6% of the fatally injured pilots in the study were flying while impaired. The mean blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of the alcohol-positive pilots was 0.15%, nearly four times the 0.04% BAC offense level established by current Federal Aviation Administration regulations. The safety issues discussed in this report are the need for comprehensive State laws pertaining to alcohol and drug use in general aviation, and the need to prevent pilots from flying while impaired by alcohol or other drugs. Recommendations concerning these issues were made to the Federal Aviation Administration, the States, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Experimental Aircraft Association, the National Agricultural Aviation Association, the National Air Transportation Association, the National Association of Flight Instructors, and the National Association of State Aviation Officials.

  • Corporate Authors:

    National Transportation Safety Board

    Bureau of Accident Investigation, 800 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  United States  20594
  • Publication Date: 1992-10-14

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 170 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00628894
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NTSB/SS-92/03, Notation 5841
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 23 1993 12:00AM