RESPONSE SPEED AS A FUNCTION OF SENSORY PATTERN AND ALCOHOL IN A VELOCITY JUDGEMENT TASK

This research studied the accuracy and rapidity with which judgments of the speed of the vehicle in which the subject travels are formed. Fifteen subjects made velocity judgements in a laboratory setting simulating the visual and auditory cues generated by an automobile moving down the roadway at various speeds. Visual speeds ranging zero to 129 km/hr. Subjects were instructed to respond as quickly and accurately as possible. Safety depends on response speed as well as judgement accuracy. This study analyses the speed of response in the forming of vehicular velocity judgements as the sensory input, upon which such judgement is based, varies. The results indicate the following: (1) The acquisition of velocity information is most rapid with visual information. (2) Within the visual modality peripheral stimulation requires more processing time than frontal information. (3) For all modalities studied reaction time increases as observation time increases from 0.5 to 1.0 sec. Decreasing observation time to less than 0.5 sec does not further reduce processing time. (4) Interactive effects across subjects mask the effects of moderate blood alcohol levels on response speed. (5) Interpretation is modified by field conditions and driving skill.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Taylor & Francis

    4 Park Square, Milton Park
    Abingdon,   United Kingdom  OX14 4RN
  • Authors:
    • Salvatore, S
  • Publication Date: 1975-9

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00130749
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Highway Safety Research Institute
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 21 1976 12:00AM