AVIATION SAFETY: PROGRESS LIMITED WITH SELF-AUDIT AND SAFETY VIOLATION REPORTING PROGRAMS

The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined airline participation in two major initiatives to improve air safety--the internal evaluation, or self-audit, program and the voluntary disclosure program. Although these programs were announced twice--first in 1987 and then in 1990--progress in implementing both programs has been limited. Of the four major and six smaller airlines GAO visited, only one believed it met, or planned to meet, the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) self-audit guidelines. These 10 airlines carried about 57% of the flying public in 1990. Similarly, as of September 1991, voluntary disclosures were limited to 292 reports from 96 airlines, or about 3% of the 3,031 eligible to participate. The industry appears to be in a "wait and see" posture for two basic reasons. First, the airlines are skeptical that program benefits outweigh their costs. Second, shortcomings in FAA program administration have resulted in confusion among airline officials and FAA inspectors alike and compounded airline doubts about the programs.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Aviation, Committee on Public Works and Transportation, House of Representatives.
  • Corporate Authors:

    U.S. General Accounting Office

    441 G Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20548
  • Publication Date: 1992-3

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 20 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00624859
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: GAO/RCED-92-85
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 1 1993 12:00AM