PAYING FOR HIGHWAYS, AIRWAYS, AND WATERWAYS: HOW CAN USERS BE CHARGED?

The combination of budgetary pressures at all levels of government and increasing demands on transportation facilities has generated increased interest in directly charging users of highways, airways, and waterways. In response to a request from the Senate Committee on the Budget, this study examines the advantages and disadvantages of alternative user fee structures, including existing taxes. Chapter 1, Introduction, examines the following: federal financing of the transportation infrastructure; economic efficiency and other goals; the role of prices in fostering economic efficiency; cost recovery under economies of scale; equity considerations; administrative feasibility; efficiency in investment; and the transition from taxes and subsidies to prices. Chapter 2, Highways, discusses federal spending on highways, current financing policy, costs and efficient charges, and other considerations in adopting new user charges. Chapter 3, Airways, examines current financing policy, the relationship of taxes to costs of ATC, and alternative financing mechanisms. Chapter 4, Inland Waterways, examines federal spending on waterways, current financing policy, and alternative financing policy. An appendix discusses "Top-Down" cost allocation studies of pavement costs.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Congressional Budget Office

    Second and D Streets, SW
    Washington, DC  United States  20515
  • Publication Date: 1992-5

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 87 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00624816
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0160379377
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 20 1993 12:00AM