WHY ALTERNATIVE FUELS? WHERE WE ARE TODAY: WHERE WE MIGHT BE GOING. IN: THE TRANSPORTATION IMPACTS OF THE CLEAN AIR ACT: MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELS. ABSTRACTED PROCEEDINGS. DES MOINES, IOWA, JULY 25-26, 1991

Development of transportation vehicles which can operate on alternative fuels began in recognition of the finite supply of crude oil in the world, making new sources of energy a requirement in the future. The alternative fuels under study include natural gas, propane, methanol, ethanol, and more recently, reformulated gasoline and diesel fuel. Electric vehicle development has accelerated recently also. These fuels and vehicles have the potential to improve air quality compared with today's conventional fuels. Improvement in air quality in the past in the U.S. has focused primarily on lowering of the vehicle tailpipe emissions, with a 96 percent reductionin hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide emissions achieved compared to pre-control vehicles, and a 76 percent reduction in oxides of nitrogen. Therefore, further tailpipe reductions will not result in much change in air quality. Instead, it is now realized that there is a bigger opportunity for air quality improvement by using fuels whose combustion products have a lower chemical reactivity in the atmosphere, resulting in less formation of ozone, which has been the most difficult air quality standard to meet in many regions of the U.S.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Midwest Transportation Consortium

    Iowa State University, 2711 South Loop Drive, Suite 4700
    Ames, IA  United States  50010-8664
  • Authors:
    • Nichols, R J
  • Publication Date: 1991-7

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00618601
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 31 1992 12:00AM