THE EFFECTS OF AGE AND EXPERIENCE ON ACCIDENTS WITH INJURIES: SHOULD THE LICENSING AGE BE RAISED?

In Canadian Provinces and in several states of the United States the minimum legal age to drive a motor vehicle is 16 years and in some it is 15. The excess mortality and morbidity registered by 15 to 24-year old drivers is well known. Several studies have reported that accident rates decrease with experience, but the effect of age of new drivers has not been well documented. The objective is to study injury accident rates in terms of age and experience factors. The data sources are computer files of the Government Insurance Corporation, which covers all Quebec drivers. For each driver, the file contains birth date, sex, year and month of first license, involvement in accidents, and other parameters. The yearly rates (1970-84) of new permits per age last birthday and sex show an increase over time, particularly for 16-year old men. For the period 1979-84, injury accident involvement rates were computed for all Quebec drivers by age, sex, and driving experience. An experienced driver has been defined as a person who has been licensed for at least one year. The results show, for experienced as well as inexperienced young men (16-18), a high injury accident rate that decreases with age. For women, the rates are much lower and decrease more gradually than for men. This study does not take into account the kilometers driven. Since young drivers (16-18) have the highest accident rates, the question of regulating access to first licensing for such drivers must be examined as a possible strategy for injury prevention.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Pergamon Press, Incorporated

    Headington Hill Hall
    Oxford OX30BW,    
  • Authors:
    • LABERGE-NADEAU, C
    • Maag, U
    • Bourbeau, R
  • Publication Date: 1992-4

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00622768
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 30 1992 12:00AM