PEDESTRIAN AND HYPOTHERMIA DEATHS AMONG NATIVE AMERICANS IN NEW MEXICO - BETWEEN BAR AND HOME

This study utilized a retrospective review of death certificates for deaths from unintentional injuries among Native Americans in New Mexico. This applied to the period between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 1989. New Mexico Native Americans were nearly eight times more likely to die in pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes and were 30 times more likely to die of hypothermia compared with other New Mexico residents. At death, 90 percent of those Native Americans tested were highly intoxicated. Despite the fact that most Native Americans in New Mexico live on reservations, most deaths occurred at off-reservation sites in border towns and on roads leading back to the reservation. Possession and sale of alcohol is illegal on many reservations, which forces those who want to drink to travel long distances to do so. Data suggest that this policy is the likely explanation for the high risk of death from hypothermia and pedestrian-motor vehicle crashes in this population.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    American Medical Association

    535 North Dearborn Street
    Chicago, IL  United States  60610
  • Authors:
    • Gallaher, M M
    • Fleming, D W
    • BERGER, L R
    • Sewell, M
  • Publication Date: 1992-3-11

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00621982
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 31 1992 12:00AM