AN UNFORTUNATE PATTERN IN U.S. DOMESTIC JET ACCIDENTS

This paper indicates that U.S. jet flights which recently suffered major crashes, averaged nearly twice as many passengers on board as U.S. jet flights that were uneventful. This statistically-significant excess results from two phenomena: a strong association between load factor (percentage of seats occupied) and the risk of a major crash; and, an over-representation of widebody jets among ill-fated aircraft. The authors define a crash as major if it results in the death of at least 20 percent of the passengers on board. In practice, the dichotomy "above/below 20 percent" partitions crashes into two vastly different clusters; the former generally entail low survival rates and the heavy loss of life, while the latter usually involve three or fewer fatalities.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Flight Safety Foundation, Incorporated

    2200 Wilson Boulevard
    Arlington, VA  United States  22201
  • Authors:
    • Barnett, Anthony
    • Curtis, T
  • Publication Date: 1991-10

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 1-8
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00620719
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 31 2003 12:00AM