ECONOMIC AND SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING MINIMUM LATERAL OBSTACLE CLEARANCE POLICIES FOR UTILITY FACILITIES IN NEBRASKA URBAN AND SUBURBAN AREAS

The Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) is reviewing the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) policy for lateral obstacle clearance or offset for utility facilities on curbed sections along new or reconstructed municipal state highways in urban areas. The FHWA requires that utility appurtenances such as fire hydrants, utility poles, light poles or luminaires, gas pipeline structures, etc., be located at 6 ft minimum lateral offset from the back of the curb for new or reconstructed municipal state highways. Since accidents involving utility poles are associated with one of the higher rates of accident severity, a considerable reduction in both accident frequency and accident severity could be obtained by specifically studying and analyzing utility pole installations. Basic street lighting and fire hydrants were also emphasized in the study. The cost-effectiveness methodologies selected for use in the study were presented in FHWA report number FHWA-IP-86-9, "Selection of Cost-Effective Countermeasures for Utility Pole Accidents--User's Manual," by Zegeer and Cynecki; and the AASHTO publication entitled, "Roadside Design Guide" 1988. Computer models were developed for both methodologies. The first, "UPACE," was intended for use with utility installations having multiple appurtenances in a line or a row, for example, a line of power poles; the second, "ROADSIDE," was intended for use with single utility installations such as fire hydrants. Seven actual safety improvement projects were analyzed with UPACE to evaluate current standards and their effectiveness, obtain actual field data, and validate various parts of the computer model. After the site-specific analyses were completed, it was evident that a more detailed breakdown was needed for the various typical utility installations. Accordingly, general site analyses were performed with UPACE for various typical utility installations such as street lighting, power distribution, power transmission, and breakaway light and utility poles. A benefit-to-cost ratio methodology was used as the basis for the results and conclusions. General site analyses were also performed with ROADSIDE for various typical single utility installations such as utility poles, light poles, and fire hydrants; and for one actual site, a gas installation.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Nebraska, Lincoln

    Midwest Roadside Safety Facility
    2200 Vine Street, Whittier Building
    Lincoln, NE  United States  68583-0853

    Nebraska Department of Roads

    1500 Highway 2, P.O. Box 94759
    Lincoln, NE  United States  68509
  • Authors:
    • Faller, R K
    • Holloway, J C
    • Post, E R
    • Ataullah, S
  • Publication Date: 1991-12

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 258 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00623625
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TRP-03-022-90, RES1 (0099) P438
  • Files: TRIS, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jul 31 1992 12:00AM