THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ABLE TO STOP

This first of three installments about the development of the air brake describes how George Westinghouse adapted compressed air to the control and stopping of trains. It covers U.S. applications from 1869 to the 1890s. This period saw the refinement of the straight air brake because it was not fail safe and was slow to respond in long trains into the automatic air brake based on the triple valve. Utilized first in passenger service in the early 1870s, applications of automatic brakes were made in freight service in 1877. The industry then sponsored a series of tests aimed at standardizing and appraising the limits of capabilities of air brakes. By 1890 the industry was ready to move toward industry-wide application.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Kalmbach Publishing Company

    21027 Crossroads Circle
    P.O. Box 1612
    Waukesha, WI  United States  53187-1612
  • Authors:
    • Blaine, D G
  • Publication Date: 1975-10

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: p. 44-53
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00129318
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 19 1976 12:00AM