INFLUENCE OF CHLORIDES, CARBONATION AND SURFACE FILMS ON CORROSION OF STEEL IN CONCRETE. FINAL REPORT

Experiments were developed and performed to determine if glass electrodes can be employed to accurately measure pH of pore water in concrete. An attempt was made to determine the reason for the general underestimation of the alkalinity of pore water by one or more pH units when glass electrodes are used as sensors compared to the OH ion concentration obtained from titration of pore solutions expressed from hydrated cement samples. The linear response and alkaline error of glass electrodes was investigated. pH was measured for mortar samples cast in air as well as under CO2-free conditions. A flat-surface combination electrode was mostly employed for this purpose, but studies also involved the use of a microelectrode. The possible role played by Ca(OH)2 liberated during cement hydration in decarbonation of pore water is discussed based on experiments. Projections are made regarding pH and chloride-to-hydroxide service life changes which are likely under different conditions of pore water leaching and carbonation, and the implication of these with regard to concrete bridge structures in Florida are discussed.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Florida Atlantic University, Dania Beach

    Department of Ocean Engineering, 101 North Beach Road
    Dania Beach, FL  United States  33004

    Florida Department of Transportation

    Office of Materials and Research, P.O. Box 1029
    Gainesville, FL  United States  32602

    Federal Highway Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590
  • Authors:
    • Hartt, W H
    • Balamuralikrishna, R
  • Publication Date: 1990-10-1

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 90 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00619175
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FL/DOT/RMC/0440-2904, FL/DOT/TRC/440-2904, WPI 0510440
  • Contract Numbers: C-2904
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Feb 29 1992 12:00AM