INJURY CONTROL AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION. SYMPOSIUM ON MOTOR VEHICLE INJURIES: PROCEEDINGS. DECEMBER 7, 1987, NEW YORK, NEW YORK

This paper discusses engineering education and the approach it has taken to incorporate such areas as public health and safety into the education of all engineers. There are about 300 engineering schools in the United States involved in engineering education, with the great majority having accredited programs. They produce some 70 to 80 thousand engineering graduates each year. While much is being done to ensure that they receive training in the safety concerns of their chosen area of engineering, there is still much that remains undone. For example, the data reveal that we in fact do not do very well at uniformly impacting on all the 80 thousand or so engineers who graduate each year. We do very well with requiring safety programs in some curricula, but it is the function of the individual faculty member or department chairman or dean at a particular location to develop a program and to incorporate it. One approach to dealing with this problem is to make use of the recently established Council on Health and Safety Accreditation, designed to develop educational materials for use in engineering and related curricula. It is attempting to develop whole curricula aimed at safety engineering that would lead to specialists, both undergraduate and graduate, who have accredited safety engineering backgrounds.

  • Corporate Authors:

    New York Academy of Medicine

    Two East 103rd Street
    New York, NY  United States  10029
  • Authors:
    • Jones, R C
  • Publication Date: 1988-9

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00616432
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 31 1991 12:00AM