ANALOGUE MEASUREMENT OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION: EFFECTS FOR TASK TYPE AND CORRESPONDENCE WITH SELF-REPORT MEASUREMENT

Properties of a widely used measure of analogue alcohol consumption, the taste-rating task, were investigated. It was predicted and found that the taste-rating task led to more frequent sipping, smaller sip volume and a steeper decline in sipping across the 15 min drinking period than a procedurally similar tavern-evaluation task. These data demonstrate that the taste-rating task conveys implicit "how to drink" demands that seem to alter natural drinking topography. Examination of the correspondence between self-report and analogue consumption revealed that preexperimental estimates of typical drinking were significant yet modest predictors of analogue consumption. Moreover, postexperimental estimates of analogue consumption revealed that subjects accurately self-reported laboratory drinking, with taste-rating subjects showing more accuracy. Limitations of taste-rating methodology and directions for further investigation of analogue consumption measures are discussed.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Alcohol Research Documentation, Incorporated

    P.O. Box 969
    Piscataway, NJ  United States  08854
  • Authors:
    • George, W H
    • PHILLIPS, S M
    • Skinner, J B
  • Publication Date: 1988-9

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 450-455
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00608562
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-040 842
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: May 31 1991 12:00AM