MOTOR VEHICLE CRASH INJURY PATTERNS AND THE VIRGINIA SEAT BELT LAW

Injuries to front seat occupants in tow-away crashes in the Charlottesville, Virginia, area were compared for 1 year before and 1 year after Virginia's seat belt law took effect. Vehicle and occupant data were combined to examine crash and injury patterns. Reported seat belt use in crashes increased after the law, and there were substantial decreases in injuries. Front seat occupants were less likely to receive medical treatment following a crash in the postlaw period. The reduction in the numbers of injuries was greater for passengers in the right front seat than for drivers and for frontal crashes than for other types of crashes. The injury reducton effects occurred primarily through reductions in the number of head and face injuries, particularly those that occur from contact with windshields and instrument panels.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    American Medical Association

    535 North Dearborn Street
    Chicago, IL  United States  60610
  • Authors:
    • Lestina, D C
    • Williams, A F
    • LUND, A K
    • Zador, P
    • KUHLMANN, T P
  • Publication Date: 1991-3-20

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00607391
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 30 1991 12:00AM