FIXINGS IN CRACKED CONCRETE. THE PROBABILITY OF COINCIDENT OCCURENCE AND LIKELY CRACK WIDTH

The proposals being put forward for testing fixings require consideration of the possibility of a crack forming in the concrete through the location of the fixing. There is considerable debate about what width of crack is appropriate for the tests. To assist in establishing a reasonable test regime, a study was commissioned to try to define, from calculation, what widths of crack could actually be expected to occur in buildings. This report considers the factors affecting the likelihood of cracks occurring in actual structures and their likely widths. Two types of cracking are considered in detail: cracking due to applied loads and cracking resulting from the restraint to shortening of members due to shrinkage and cooling. It is concluded that, in properly designed members, the probability of cracks due to loading being greater that 0.3mm is of the order of 10-5. Cracks resulting from restraint of early thermal shortening can be larger but will have occurred prior to installations of fastenings. Shrinkage is unlikely to lead to major cracking. It must be concluded that there is no logic in testing fixings in cracks greater than 0.3mm wide.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Construction Industry Research & Information Assoc

    6 Storey's Gate
    London SW1P 3AU,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Beeby, A W
  • Publication Date: 1990

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00607131
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • ISBN: 0-86017-315-1
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 31 1991 12:00AM