DEVELOPMENT OF SULFUR-INFILTRATED HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE

Sulfur-infiltrated, high-strength concrete has been developed at early ages from 2 day old conventional concrete containing low cement content. Two infiltration procedures have been employed. Procedure A consists of moist curing fresh concrete specimens for 24 hr. drying them at 250 F (121 C) for 24 hr, immersing them in a bath of molten sulfur for 3 hr, removing them from sulfur to cool, and then testing 1 to 2 hr later. Procedure B consists of moist curing fresh concrete specimens for 24 hr, drying them at 250 F (121 C) for 24 hr, immersing them in molten sulfur under vacuum for 2 hr, releasing the vacuum and soaking them for an additional 1/2 hr, then removing them from sulfur to cool. Testing is done 1 to 2 hr later. Satisfactory high-strength concretes have been produced using the above procedures, with superior results being obtained using Procedure B. The sulfur-infiltrated concretes exhibit phenomenal increases in mechanical and elastic properties and durability characteristics. A typical value of the compressive strength of the infiltrated specimens using Procedure B was 8060 psi (55.3 MN sq m) compared with 810 psi (5.6 MN sq m) for reference moist cured specimens. The sulfur-infiltrated specimens were in excellent condition after more than 800 cycles of freezing and thawing, whereas the moist cured specimens had completely disintegrated after 40 cycles. This new type of concrete appears to be eminently suited for precast concrete units, such as pipes, poles, farm silos, and railway ties, and is a practical substitute for expensive polymer-impregnated concrete. /Author/

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 466-473
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00127512
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: #72-32
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 14 1976 12:00AM