THE INFLUENCE OF AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON TAILPIPE EMISSIONS FROM 1984-1987 MODEL YEAR LIGHT DUTY GASOLINE MOTOR VEHICLES

Motor vehicle emissions are sensitive to a number of variables including ambient temperature, driving schedule (speed vs time) and fuel composition. Hydrocarbon (HC), aldehyde, carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NO-X) emissions were examined with nine recent technology 4-cylinder gasoline motor vehicles at 21.1 deg C (70 deg F), 4.4 deg C (40 deg F), and -6.7 deg C (20 deg F). About 200 HC and 12 aldehyde compounds were included in the organic emissions characterization. Two fuels and two driving schedules were used. Typically, HC and CO emissions were significantly increased by reduced ambient temperature. NO-X emissions also increased, but to a lesser extent. There were no predictable formaldehyde emissions trend with temperature. Paraffins and aromatic HC emission fractions were sensitive to fuel composition, but the olefinic emission fraction (dominated by ethylene and propylene) was not. With low temperature cold start tests, preceding driving with a 5 min engine idle resulted in reduced CO emission rates and elevated NO-X emission rates. HC emission rates were not predictably sensitive to the preliminary idle.(A)

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Pergamon Press, Incorporated

    Headington Hill Hall
    Oxford OX30BW,    
  • Authors:
    • Stump, F
    • Tejada, S
    • Ray, W
    • Dropkin, D
    • Black, F
  • Publication Date: 1989

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00606466
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 31 1991 12:00AM