CATHODIC PROTECTION - STATE OF THE ART REVIEW

The principal source of chloride contamination in the UK is salt which is widely used for de-icing roads and puts bridges and car parks at risk. Corrosion in steel is an electro-chemical process leading to the formation of anodic areas where the corrosion takes place. Cathodic protection is achieved by impressing a direct current to oppose the current associated with corrosion from an anode system placed on the concrete surface. At present there are two principal types of anode systems in use: conductive coatings applied to the surface of the concrete; and cementitious overlays containing conductive polymers or metal meshes. A number of surface mounted discrete anode systems are in the course of development. Examples are given of the use of each type of system on bridges and structures. Conductive coatings can be applied relatively easily to horizontal and vertical surfaces, not subjected to wear, at approximately half the cost of systems incorporated in a cementitious overlay. Sprayed zinc coatings are better for structures that are repeatedly wetted. Mesh anodes with cementitious overlays provide a durable wearing surface but impose a height and weight penalty.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    CONCRETE SOCIETY

    London,   United Kingdom 
  • Authors:
    • BOAM, K
  • Publication Date: 1989-9

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 19-20
  • Serial:
    • CONCRETE
    • Volume: 23
    • Issue Number: 8
    • Publisher: THE CONCRETE SOCIETY
    • ISSN: 0010-5317

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00604871
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 28 1991 12:00AM