PLANNING FOR NEW AND INTEGRATED DEMAND-RESPONSIVE SYSTEMS. SPEAKER 4

The initial success and some problems faced by a demand- responsive transportation (DRT) service in Oakland, California, are briefly described. The passenger response has been 3 times that of other DRT operations of comparable size. Telephone tie-up was experienced when control room operators were instructed to call-back and verify calls for service. The DRT vehicle consisted of a conventional bus from which a 6 ft. section was cut out and then rejoined; this vehicle could then negotiate turns at some difficult intersections (minibuses were found unsatisfactory). The vehicle interiors were tastefully remodeled. Drivers were given an intensive 2-week training session and control room operators who ride with drivers derive the benefit of personal contact. DRT fares are 25 cents and no transfers are issued or accepted. The marketing of DRT services received assistance from the Model Cities Program and from the city of Richmond. The cost of operating the DRT system remains a problem and the question is asked whether the public is willing to pay the price through taxes, fares, or federal/state subsidies.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: p. 32
  • Monograph Title: DEMAND-RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS & SERVICES
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00126158
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Dec 3 1981 12:00AM