EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF HUMAN STEERING BEHAVIOR IN A SIMULATED ROAD DRIVING TASK. PART 2

EXPERIMENTELLE UNTERSUCHUNG DES MENSCHLICHEN LENKVERHALTENS BEI SIMULIERTER STRASSENFAHART. TEIL 2

Detailed discussions on the driver's visual perception process described in part 1 of the present paper lead to the formation of a control engineering structural scheme of human steering behavior. The structural scheme represents two aspects of steering behavior corresponding to two types of information derived from the driver's visual field. One aspect is the derivation of the deterministic forcing function from the observable part of the road in front of the vehicle and its processing into a deterministic open loop steering signal being executed in an anticipatory manner when the forcing function changes. The other aspect involves the perception of deviations from the prespecified forcing function and their processing into a closed loop compensatory steering signal which is superimposed on the deterministic open loop signal. Because of the limited accuracy of human perception, information processing and motor reactions, the steering control signal of the driver contains random portions which are not correlated with his input signals. These random signals account for the stochastic portions in the system output variables. Analysis of experimental data yields characteristics functions which are typical for the group of six young men who participated as subjects in the experiments. These typical functions describe deterministic and stochastic portions of the varialbes and provide information about the two functional units in the structural scheme representing the driver. The typical responses of control and output variables in the neighborhood of steps in desired path curvature show that the driver reacts upon changes of the road course in an anticipatory manner, i.e. his steering responses starts 1.0 to 2.0 seconds before passing the point of desired path curvature change. This time interval is called anticipation time. Amplitude histograms of the control and output variables indicate that the distributions of the stochastic signal portions are approximately Gaussian with the exception of steering angle on straight road sections. Power density spectra in road sections of different curvatures clearly reflect the fact that steering in curves is more difficult than on straight roads. In spite of higher steering activity in curves the driver does not ucceed in holding the variances of the output variables as small as on straight road sections.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Franckhlsche Verlagshandlung

    Pfizerstrasse 5, Postfach 640
    7000 Stuttgart 1,   Germany 
  • Authors:
    • DONGES, E
  • Publication Date: 1975-6

Language

  • German

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00125346
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Highway Safety Research Institute
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 3 1975 12:00AM