THE EFFICIENT AND ECONOMIC USE OF EXISTING URBAN ROAD NETWORKS HAVING REGARD TO CONSIDERATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT

This thesis examines the implications of congestion and the means by which it may be avoided. It begins by examining current urban transport planning philosophy, which the author writes is derived largely from the buchanan report. The focus is on methods of influencing demand and the advantages and disadvantages of each are examined in turn. These include permits and licences, road pricing, parking control, and improving public transport along with land use controls. Concluding that none of these will be practical or effective the author suggests that the results of unplanned restraint or congestion should be explored. A theory of congestion is given which includes personal characteristics, activities, trip characteristics, the subjective assessment of congestion and costs and benefits. A number of options that individuals may take to avoid congestion follow from this and these are listed. Decision levels are identified and the interrelationships between the options explored in detail with an assessment of the ability to control the options added. A section on implications examines the effects of altering design standards from peak to average daily flow and the potential of environmental management. The author argues that the latter type of scheme has been unsuccessful for a variety of reasons. Research is suggested so that the implications and characteristics of congestion may be better understood. The author concludes that a problem which is national and social in nature is being tackled with solutions which are local and technical. /TRRL/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Institution of Municipal Engineers

    25 Eccleston Square
    London SW1 V1NX,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Collins, M S
  • Publication Date: 1974-10

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00125078
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 18 1981 12:00AM