THE USE OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR ASSESSING TRAFFIC CONTROL SYSTEMS IN GLASGOW

This report describes an experiment in the use of aerial photography for assessing methods of co-ordinating the traffic signals in a network. The experiment took place in Glasgow during the autumn of 1969 when a normal 'floating-car' survey was in progress so that the results of the two methods could be compared. Adverse weather conditions prevented much of the planned photography from taking place, and only five successful photographic runs out of a projected twenty-seven were made. This meant that insufficient data were collected to allow a direct statistical comparison of the aerial and floating-car surveys, but there was evidence to suggest that aerial photography could give accurate results if light conditions were suitable. Practical difficulties arising from lack of daylight at peak times throughout the world, and also from bad weather, will often rule out the use of aerial photography for traffic studies. Considerably fewer staff are needed for aerial photography, but the technique is rather more expensive than a 'floating-car' survey. /Author/TRRL/

  • Corporate Authors:

    Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)

    Wokingham, Berkshire  United Kingdom 
  • Authors:
    • Baker, R T
    • OWENS, D
  • Publication Date: 1974

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 22 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00097180
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TRRL 93UC Monograph
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 13 1975 12:00AM