THE DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A FIELD METHOD FOR IN-SITU STRESS DETERMINATION USING HYDRAULIC FRACTURING

The Deep Stress Probe, a special field tool, has been developed for use in determining in-situ stresses at great depth in rock masses. The tool, adapted from oil well logging equipment, features orientation and downhole pressure recording components and needs only one lowering for each complete measurement at a certain horizon. A Laboratory technique was developed to control fracture propagation in laboratory tests simulating practical hydraulic fracturing situations. These studies reveal that permeability may increase dramatically prior to macroscopic fracture in hydraulic fracturing. This is very significant and allows a better understanding of the factors affecting the breakdown pressure (rate of loading, viscosity of fracturing fluid). In conclusion, hydraulic fracturing is still considered to be a useful technique to determine the orientation and the value of the minimum principal stress. However, the use of the simple isotropic elastic approach is open to serious questions. Further work is necessary in order to establish the framework upon which the performance and interpretation of hydraulic fracturing tests should be based.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

    Department of Civil and Mineral Engineering, 122 Civil and Mineral Engineering Building
    Minneapolis, MN  United States  55455-0220
  • Authors:
    • Roegiers, J C
  • Publication Date: 1975-3

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 295 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00096329
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Rept. No. MRD-1-75 Technical
  • Contract Numbers: DACW045-74-C-0006
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 15 1975 12:00AM