THE IMPORTANCE OF SIZE IN AN ARCTIC SHIP

The purpose of this paper is not to put forward a detailed treatment of the subject but merely to demonstrate through a few crude models that the small ship has no useful function to fulfill in the Canadian Arctic during the ice bound season which extends over the greater part of the year. The assumptions may be criticized but to use a Newcastle expression "they are near enough for colliery work". Refinements may move the limits up or down a notch but the main conclusions are difficult to ignore. "Manhattan" was underpowered and barely large enough for Zone 6 (Eastern N.W. Passage) and for Zone 2 (Western N.W. Passage) she would be too small for commercial use as a bulk carrier whatever the power installed. Similar considerations apply to icebreakers, though since they are not required to carry a significant useful payload their limits will be at a somewhat lower displacement. In such ships, unless nuclear plants are employed, piling in power is not a useful solution. The fuel requirements for the increased power severely restrict radius of action. And, if the operational range is a design requirement, as it must be, more power means more fuel and hence increased displacement. Thus in all cases there is a lower limit on practical size which, if not provided, may produce a ship of inferior performance irrespective of the technical expertise employed. Consideration of ridge breaking ability demands even larger displacements and this is readily demonstrated by application of the simple laws of mechanics in relation to known experience. No indication is given as to what size should be adopted since every case will have to be considered on its merits in relation to ice capability required and radius and zone of action. Although much basic data is lacking an indication of important considerations in screening out ships which are impractically small for the duty required is given.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Presented at the Ice Tech Symposium, Montreal, Canada, April 9-11, 1975.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers

    601 Pavonia Avenue
    Jersey City, NJ  USA  07306-2907
  • Authors:
    • Bustard, E E
  • Publication Date: 1975-4

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: 7 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00095326
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 29 1975 12:00AM