EFFECTS OF TRANSPORTATION ON OZONE IN CITIES. APPRAISAL OF THE AIR QUALITY PLANNING PROCESS

From the 1970s through the mid-1980s, public agencies took part in two or three rounds of detailed and complex planning exercises involving compilations of emissions inventories, development and testing of photochemical air quality models, and, through the use of these models, evaluation of alternative emissions control strategies. Typically, the plans that emerged suggested that attainment of the ozone standard could be achieved in a prescribed time frame. During the last decade, however, peak ozone concentrations in most areas declined less than predicted. This apparent miscalculation has disturbed regulators so that they treat attainment of recommended ozone levels as a primary topic in the current debates on amending the Clean Air Act. This article looks at some of the possible reasons for the discrepancies between the predictions of the planning process and the observations of recent years. This is followed by a discussion of possible actions that researchers and regulators can take to improve the basis for making plans for attaining ozone reduction standards.

Media Info

  • Features: Photos; References;
  • Pagination: p. 11-16
  • Serial:
    • TR News
    • Issue Number: 148
    • Publisher: Transportation Research Board
    • ISSN: 0738-6826
  • Publication flags:

    Open Access (libre)

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00497226
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 30 1990 12:00AM