EFFECTS OF ACUTE, ORAL ETHANOL ON CARDIOVASCULAR PERFORMANCE BEFORE AND AFTER EXPERIMENTAL BLUNT CARDIAC TRAUMA

Acute changes in hemodynamic and electrophysiologic indices were measured following blunt cardiac trauma, oral ethanol, and a combination of both in dogs. Impacts with a velocity of 10 m/sec and a contact compression of 5 cm were delivered to most of the pericardium. Transient arrhythmias in impacted animals resulted in significant reductions in all hemodynamic responses at 15 minutes post-impact. Intragastric doses of 50% ethanol/distilled water yielded average blood alcohol concentrations of 60 plus or minus 10 mg%, 120 plus or minus 20 mg%, and 180 plus or minus 15 mg%. Alcohol effected significant reductions in dp/dt and cardiac index and elevations in total peripheral resistance during treatment. Alcohol and trauma resulted in percent mortalities of 17, 50, and 71% for each such group primarily from electrical-mechanical dissociation. Surviving animals experienced significant declines in dp/dt, cardiac index, and mean aortic pressure at 15 minutes post-impact. Mean aortic pressure remained depressed while dp/dt, cardiac index, and total peripheral resistance returned to control values.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

    428 East Preston Street
    Baltimore, MD  United States  21202
  • Authors:
    • Desiderio, M A
  • Publication Date: 1987-3

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00491850
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-040 157
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Mar 31 1990 12:00AM