SPECIAL INVESTIGATION REPORT: BRAKE PERFORMANCE OF THE MCDONNELL DOUGLAS DC-10-30/40 DURING HIGH SPEED, HIGH ENERGY REJECTED TAKEOFFS

On May 21, 1988, a McDonnell Douglas Corporation DC-10-30 overran the runway during a rejected takeoff (RTO) at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, Texas. The airplane was damaged beyond economical repair, and 8 occupants were injured. The brakes had been certified to FAA-approved procedures, yet failed at only 36% of the design requirement. As a result of this accident, the Safety Board conducted a special investigation of DC-10-30/40 brakes. The investigation found that the testing requirements and procedures for certifying DC-10-30/40 brakes were inadequate, only new brakes were used for the certification tests, and that worn brakes do not have the energy capacity or stopping capability of new brakes. The Safety Board also examined the potential decrease of the accelerate-stop safety margin for RTOs provided in the FAA Approved Airplane Flight Manual. The Safety Board believes that the concerns expressed about the adequacy of the certification process for the DC-10-30/40 may apply to the certification of all transport category airplanes. Recommendations were issued to the Federal Aviation Administration and focus on the following safety issues: certification tests and procedures related to the brakes of the DC-10-30/40; brake wear replacement limits; and airplane stopping distance.

  • Corporate Authors:

    National Transportation Safety Board

    Bureau of Technology, 800 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  United States  20594
  • Publication Date: 1990-2-27

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices;
  • Pagination: 42 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00494509
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NTSB/SIR-90/01
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 31 1990 12:00AM