THE USE OF VESTIBULAR TESTS IN CIVIL AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS: SURVEY OF PRACTICES AND PROPOSALS BY AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINERS

A brief, voluntary questionnaire was administered to 1,115 Aviation Medical Examiners (AME) to assess the frequency with which vestibular tests (broadly defined) were given during physical examinations of pilots, which tests were used, why they were used, whether AMEs believed that specific tests should be routine, and why they believed so. Responses were obtained from 55 percent of the AMEs (many not responding were new AMEs with no experience). Of the respondents, 58 percent routinely gave tests of balance, equilibrium, or vestibular functioning, 24 percent gave the tests under certain conditions, and 18 percent gave no tests. The Romberg and finger-pointing tests were the most frequently used and were employed most often for screening purposes or to identify a problem area. Seventy-five percent of the AMEs indicated that specific tests should be routine; the test most frequently recommended was the Romberg.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Federal Aviation Administration

    Flight Standards Service, 800 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  United States  20591
  • Authors:
    • Collins, W E
    • Lennon, A O
    • Grimm, E J
  • Publication Date: 1975-4

Media Info

  • Pagination: 9 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00092977
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FAA-AM-75-4
  • Files: NTIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Nov 18 1976 12:00AM