THE ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS OF INCREASED USE OF PFA AND GRANULATED SLAG

This paper addresses the issue of whether or not increased use of pulverized fuel ash (pfa) and ground granulated blast-furnance slag in concrete as partial replacement for Portland cement can have economic, amenity, and technical advantages. It is concluded that such benefits can be gained. However, they are difficult to quantify in monetary terms. Significant savings are foreseen in capital expenditures on production plants and in recurrent costs. The most important element in the latter case, particularly in the long-term, is seen as savings in energy consumption. There are environmental benefits in preventing increased need for quarrying raw materials, in the case of pfa by reducing dereliction by dumpting, and in karkedly reduced needs for land for plant construction. The possibility is also seen, however, of improvements in the overall efficiency of the cement industry. It is emphasized that this paper is offered only as a contribution to the debate, and not as a definite solution.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Reprinted from Resources Policy, Vol.1, No.2, March 1975, pp 154-170.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Building Research Establishment

    Building Research Station, Garston
    Watford WD2 7JR, Hertsford,   England 
  • Authors:
    • SMITH, M A
  • Publication Date: 1975-4

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 17 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00127567
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: CP 41/75
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 29 1975 12:00AM