HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF THE CATALYTIC CONVERTER

The oxidation catalytic converter should substantially reduce emissions of hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO), total oxygenates and certain aromatics. Ozone levels should also be reduced as a result of lower levels of HC and NO. Atmospheric lead should be reduced since low-lead gasoline must be used with the converter. There are, however, several adverse effects which could result from use of the catalytic converter: (1) recent tests indicate that these devices emit sulfates and sulfuric acid, both of which would have adverse health impacts; (2) if manganese is used to replace lead in gasoline, ambient manganese levels could increase; (3) the disposal of the spent catalytic materials (e.g. platinum and palladium) may cause additional environmental health problems; (4) mechanical failure of the converter will allow the automobile to emit as much pollution as the 1968 model.

  • Corporate Authors:

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    400 Maryland Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  United States  20546

    Illinois Institute for Environmental Quality

    3300 South Federal
    Chicago, IL  United States  60616
  • Publication Date: 1975-5

Media Info

  • Pagination: 23 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00091614
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: PAT-APPL-574208 Patent App
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 13 1976 12:00AM