PHENOMENA ASSOCIATED WITH THE PROCESS OF ROCK MELTING. APPLICATION TO THE SUBTERRENE SYSTEM

Fundamental rock melting and associated phenomena, important to the development of a rock-melting excavation system, are described briefly. For most rocks, their multicomponent chemical system results in relatively low-temperature ranges, irrespective of type or classification. High-pressure injection of fluxing or mineralizing agents is considered as a technological assist in lowering these melting-temperature ranges. Increased pressure is shown to increase the melting temperature of silicate rocks, but the pressure will assist in the melting of some rock types such as limestone. The energy required to melt rock, as determined by their specific heat and heat of fusion, remains within reasonably narrow limits, which introduces a degree of insensitivity to variations in the type of rock conglomerate being penetrated by melting. Corrosion phenomena for specific refractory materials of the rock-melting penetrator systems are related to both thermodynamic and kinetic factors, and the rock-glass hole linings produced are briefly described. /AUTHOR/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Sponsored in part by the national science foundation and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Los Alamos National Laboratory

    P.O. Box 1663
    Los Alamos, NM  United States  87545
  • Authors:
    • Krupka, M C
  • Publication Date: 1973-2

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 10 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00126358
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: LA-5208-MS
  • Contract Numbers: W-7405-ENG.36
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 21 1976 12:00AM