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MATERIALS USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF SHIPS FOR THE CARRIAGE OF CHEMICALS AND LOW TEMPERATURE CARGOES

The recent rapid expansion of the chemical and petrochemicals industry, superimposed on the availability and demand for natural gas as a basic fuel, the exploitation of mineral deposits, etc., has led to requirements for bulk shipments by sea of a very wide variety of products. Ships now in service or on order vary widely in size and complexity; their cargoes may be carried in containers of almost every shape; at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 2000 lb/in square; temperatures ranging from minus 319 degrees F (minus 195 degrees Centigrades) to 302 degrees F (150 degrees Centigrades) and may be stable, unstable, corrosive, inert, dielectric or conductive in varying degrees. Materials currently available to handle these cargoes range from conventional mild steel at about 50 pound sterling per ton, through clad and coated steels to a wide range of nickel alloy steels culminating in 36 percent Ni (Invar) at about 850 pound sterling per ton; also aluminum, copper alloys, plastics, glass and rubber. Compared with the materials, design and fabricating techniques that have been available in the past (for chemicals have been transported in bulk by sea for many years) the designer now has a wealth of data from which he can evaluate and select from an ever increasing range of materials; but the variety and complexity of products, size of ship and commercial pressures to reduce cost have also increased, thus the final optimum selection is no easier to arrive at than before.

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00019604
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: United States Merchant Marine Academy
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 25 1972 12:00AM