THE USE OF PHYSIOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF STRESSES IN MARINE INVERTEBRATES AS A TOOL FOR MARINE POLLUTION MONITORING

Present techniques for monitoring pollution in aquatic environments rely heavily upon methodologies which attempt to measure the concentration of a given pollutant. In marine and estuarine environments in particular, because of the possibility of synergistic effects brough about by the ionic composition of the medium, it has been suggested that physiological criteria would be a much more sensitive measure of pollution effects than a determination of the pollutant itself. Selected serum constituents of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus subjected to natural stresses (red tide and holding) and pollution related stresses (DDT and thermal shock) were compared to "baseline" concentrations of the same constituents in crabs from unstressed environments. Glucose in new year class females and serum protein in both males and females were significantly higher in red tide stressed crabs. Protein and total osmotic concentration were significantly lower in DDT stressed crabs. Thermal stress resulted in higher total ninhydrin positive substances, total osmotic concentration and glucose and lower chloride in female crabs. The technique of comparing serum constituents of animals from a given area or experimental treatment to control or baseline values offers promise as a tool for both assessing the effects of pollutants on marine and estuarine animals and for monitoring pollution effects in natural environments.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Cost of entire Proceedings is $25.00.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Marine Technology Society

    5565 Sterrett Place, Suite 108
    Columbia, MD  United States  21044
  • Authors:
    • Lynch, M P
  • Publication Date: 1974-9

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00071900
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Marine Technology Society
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 12 1974 12:00AM