ERGONOMICS AND THE MARINER

Consists of four separate papers. (1) Research in Human Behavior in Steering Large Ships deals with the intrinsic maneuverability of the ship, the environmental boundaries, and the human ability to perform the maneuvers of which the ship is technically capable in the area available. (2) The Ergonomic Bridge is clearly a requirement in the present state of technology so that the available information can be used more effectively through remote control of the ship's rudder and engines. This is not so difficult as may at first appear and with very little practice it can enhance the officer's job satisfaction and his standard of work; in ships which still require a helmsman manpower is saved. (3) Ergonomics in Ship Design. Ergonomics can mean the science of making work fit the worker or the study of man at work. This paper is confined to the aspects of ergonomics affecting ship design, which include anatomy and physiology, anthropometry, and physiological and experimental psychology. (4) The Influence of Technology on Navigation as an Occupation falls roughly into three sections: the inter-relationship between economic forces, technological change and occupations, a brief history of navigation in occupational terms, and the present and future state of the occupation. The conclusions drawn may be open to discussion, since it presents a point of view and not a specific piece of research. The four papers are followed by a six page in-depth discussion which is valuable in providing many practical insights into the problems of bridge automation and man-machine interaction.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Royal Institute of Navigation

    1 Kensington Gore
    London,   England 

    Royal Institute of Navigation

    Royal Geographical Society, 1 Kensington Gore
    London SW7,   England 
  • Publication Date: 1974-10

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  • Accession Number: 00084678
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Royal Institute of Navigation
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 1 1975 12:00AM