EFFECT OF THE TECHNOLOGY OF DRIVING PILES AND THEIR CROSS-SECTIONAL SHAPE AND DIMENSIONS ON THEIR BEARING CAPACITY IN PERMAFROST

Experimental investigations were conducted in an effort to improve the installation and technology of driving frozen-in piles into drilled boreholes. The perimeter of the boreholes was 1.35 times greater than the perimeter of the piles. Sand mortars with high freezing forces and thickened sandy-loam mortars were used, and it was proposed to fill the gaps after driving the experimental piles into the boreholes. The results of these studies were compared with results of other studies, the details of which are described. The soil in which studies were done consisted of post-glacial lacustrine deposits. The test stand constructed for the pile loading tests consisted of 2 spans; 12 anchor piles and five experimental reinforced concrete piles were driven on it. Dynamometers studied the work of the pile tip during loading of the experimental and control piles. The lateral forces of freezing were determined. An average temperature of -1.7 deg to -2.3 deg C was maintained in the freezing zones of the experimental piles. The data obtained (is analyzed) relates to the maximum freezing forces, the high mobility of sandy mortars, the joint action of the freezing forces along the lateral surface and end, the bearing capacity of piles, the imparting of appreciable loads to the base by the tip of frozen-in piles, and the calculation of the bearing capacity. A method is proposed for the estimation of the coefficient of working conditions of the tip.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Consultants Bureau

    227 West 17th Street
    New York, NY  United States  10011
  • Publication Date: 1964-1

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00083802
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 29 1975 12:00AM