PRECIPITATION OF STRONTIUM BY CALCIUM CARBONATE IN CALCAREOUS SOILS AND MEASUREMENT OF CATION-EXCHANGE CAPACITY

The reaction of strontium (Sr) and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is explained, and a column of calcareous soil is described, which is eluted by a Sr solution of greater than equilibrium concentration. Two processes will occur simultaneously, Sr (divalent) will be exchanged, and strontium carbonate (SrCO3) precipitated as CaCO3 dissolves. If the precipitation reaction is sufficiently fast, it will go to completion in a small fraction of the column length. The solution passing through most of the column will be mainly Ca (divalent) solution, and only 18.4/1.184 = 15.5 percent atm. of the total cation concentration will be Sr (divalent). The column will retain much more Sr than its exchange capacity, since theoretically all CaCO3 will be converted to SrCO3. Experiments are described which illustrate these phenomena and demonstrate that in addition to cation exchange, there exists in calcareous soils a mechanism of Sr precipitation by CaCO3. This reaction is fast enough to take place in the top fraction of the column length. A small percentage of lime in the soil will cause the retention of a much larger amount of Sr than expected from exchange capacity. Cation-exchange capacity measurements of calcareous soil with Sr solutions have therefore, no meaning.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Williams and Wikins Company

    428 East Preston Street
    Baltimore, MD  USA  21202
  • Authors:
    • Halevy, E
    • Tzur, Y
  • Publication Date: 1964-7

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 66-67
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00081583
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 19 1975 12:00AM