THE EFFECTS OF LANE WIDTH ON RIVER DRIVING STEERING CONTROL AND PERFORMANCE

Driver steering control and performance have been studied for straight lane driving in lanes of 8, 10 and 12 feet widths at speeds of 30, 40 and 50 mph. The results have been compared with the theoretical models of driver control developed by Rashevsky, and with free speed measurements taken for driving conditions similar to those of the experiment. It appears that in most cases drives were dominantly controlling the heading or path angle of the vehicle without close attention to lateral error. In doing so, most of their control was within a narrow frequency band located in the range 0.1 to 9.3 Hz. For extreme conditions of narrow lane width and high speed, drivers appeared to change their steering strategy to one dominantly involving direct control of lateral error. This apparent change in strategy was accompanied by a marked increase in the proportion of high frequency (less than 0.4 Hz) control movements and in both heading rate and heading angle error. It is suggested that the need to modify steering strategy could provide the upper bound for free speeds in narrow lanes when other restrictions are not present.

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 418-440
  • Serial:
    • Volume: 6
    • Issue Number: Pt3

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00080806
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Tielehti
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 26 1975 12:00AM